Systemic mastocytosis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, July 26, 2018 by

Systemic mastocytosis is a form of mastocytosis wherein mast cells build up in internal tissues and organs, such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and small intestines. The disorder is commonly seen in adults. Systemic mastocytosis is mainly categorized into four groups: indolent systemic mastocytosis (ISM), systemic mastocytosis with an associated hematologic non-mast cell lineage disorder (SM-AHNMD), aggressive systemic mastocytosis (ASM), and mast cell leukemia (MCL).

Known side effects of systemic mastocytosis

The known side effects of systemic mastocytosis include anemia and coagulopathy, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), pruritus and flushing, and anaphylactoid reaction. It may also cause an enlargement of the liver, spleen, or lymph nodes. Other side effects of the disease include lightheadedness, an irregular or unusually rapid beating of the heart, bone pain, headache, and ulcers in the stomach and small intestine.

Body systems harmed by systemic mastocytosis

The body systems damaged by systemic mastocytosis include the integumentary, digestive, cardiovascular, circulatory, skeletal, respiratory, and nervous systems.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent systemic mastocytosis

Foods that are good for mast cells include watercress, pea sprouts, onions, garlic, moringa, holy basil, thyme, tarragon, chamomile, nettle, peppermint, black cumin seed and oil, galangal, ginger, lotus root, turmeric, pomegranate, apples, capers, mangosteens, peaches, Chinese quince, black rice bran, and mung bean sprouts.

Treatments, management plans for systemic mastocytosis

Treatment for mastocytosis, including systemic mastocytosis, includes general measures for histamine release. Patients with systemic mastocytosis should be given special care. Triggering agents in mastocytosis include the following:

  • Contrast media, particularly those containing iodine
  • Dental and endoscopic procedures
  • Emotional factors, such as stress, anxiety, and lack of sleep
  • Infectious diseases with fever
  • Pharmaceutical drugs
  • Physical agents, such as heat and cold, sunlight, sudden changes of temperature, and pressure on skin lesions
  • Surgery
  • Venoms
  • Vaccines

Where to learn more

Summary

Systemic mastocytosis is a form of mastocytosis wherein mast cells build up in internal tissues and organs, such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and small intestines.

Systemic mastocytosis causes anemia and coagulopathy, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), pruritus and flushing, anaphylactoid reaction, enlargement of the liver, spleen, or lymph nodes, lightheadedness, irregular or unusually rapid beating of the heart, bone pain, headache, and ulcers in the stomach and small intestine.

Systemic mastocytosis harms the integumentary, digestive, cardiovascular, circulatory, skeletal, respiratory, and nervous systems.

Sources include:

RareDiseases.Info.NIH.gov

eMedicine.MedScape.com

Cancer.net

Patient.info

AlisonVickery.com.au

DermNetNZ.org



Comments

comments powered by Disqus