Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, August 08, 2018 by

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a deadly brain disorder related to the rubeola infection, commonly known as measles. The disease develops many years after a person had measles, even though he/she may seem fully recovered.

Measles doesn’t typically cause brain damage, but in some cases, there is an abnormal immune response to the infection, or, possibly, certain mutant forms of the virus lead to brain inflammation that may last for years.

SSPE generally occurs in children and adolescents and affects more males than females.

SSPE is always fatal. People with this disease die one to three years after diagnosis, but some people may survive longer.

Known symptoms of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

People with SSPE experience the following signs:

  • Changes in behavior
  • A decrease in cognitive and social abilities
  • Difficulty completing schoolwork or work
  • Dementia
  • Lethargy
  • Muscle spasms or jerking
  • Tense or lax muscles
  • Weakness in both legs
  • An unsteady gait
  • Seizures
  • Comatose

Body systems harmed by subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

Symptoms of SSPE occur in four general stages. The symptoms tend to get worse with each stage:

  • Stage I: There may be personality changes, mood swings, or depression. Fever and headache may also be present. This stage may last up to six months.
  • Stage II: There may be uncontrolled spasmodic movement or muscle jerking. Loss of vision, dementia, and seizures can also occur.
  • Stage III: Writhing or twisting movements occur, as well as rigidity. Death may occur from complications.
  • Stage IV: Areas of the brain that control breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure are damaged. This leads to coma and eventual death.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

A healthy diet and the right set of nutrients is one way of preventing many brain diseases.

Foods rich in vitamins A, C, and E have an incredible antioxidant profile which boosts the disease-fighting ability of the body. Eating foods rich in B-vitamins like folate, vitamin B6 and B12 also helps reduce the progression of various brain diseases.

High-protein foods may also help treat and prevent many brain disorders due to the presence of creatine, an amino acid which supports neuronal survival. Reduced levels of creatine in the body are associated with the progression of disorders like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, etc.

Treatments, management plans for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

There is no cure for SSPE, but some antiviral drugs may slow its progression. Physicians may prescribe anti-convulsant drugs to control seizures.

Following a healthy lifestyle can help treat and manage various brain disorders that cause anxiety and depression symptoms. Studies suggest that relaxation techniques such as yoga and deep breathing help cleanse mental toxins and relieve stress- and anxiety-related symptoms. These methods can help calm the agitated mind, promote better flow of oxygen to the brain, stimulate clear thinking, and support better sleep. Other activities that may help you de-stress include dancing, listening to music or singing, making music, meditation, and reading.

Mental exercise, as well as physical exercise, may help improve cognitive skills and may provide some welcome distraction from your anxious thoughts. Exercise your brain with challenging activities like doing a puzzle, Sudoku, playing brain games, or learning another dialect. Research suggests that activities such as climbing a tree and balancing on a beam may help to improve cognition, as these activities may help replenish brain cells and enhance neural connections.

Where to learn more

Summary

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a deadly brain disorder related to measles infection. It develops many years after the person has seemingly recovered from the illness.

SSPE generally occurs in children and adolescents and affects more males than females.

Behavioral changes and declining cognitive skills are some of the signs of SSPE.

People with SSPE die one to three years after diagnosis, but some people may survive longer.

Sources include:

MedLinePlus.gov

MSDManuals.com

Healthline.com

OrganicFacts.net



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