Scarlet fever – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, June 21, 2018 by

Scarlet fever is an infectious disease caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. The condition typically occurs in about 10 percent of individuals who have strep throat, or streptococcal pharyngitis. Patients with streptococcal skin infections or wound infections can also develop the infectious disease.

Scarlet fever is identified by a rash that looks like a sunburn with a sandpaper-like texture and fever. The group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) bacteria that causes scarlet fever produces a toxin that is responsible for the rash associated with the disease. At least 80 percent of children aged 10 develop lifelong antibodies that can protect them against the Streptococcus exotoxin.

The incubation period for scarlet fever may range from at least 12 hours to seven days. Patients are contagious during this time and during the acute illness. While the primary strep infection is contagious, the rash itself is not.

Scarlet fever is also known as scarlatina.

Known symptoms of scarlet fever

Aside from a skin rash, the signs of scarlet fever usually include:

  • Chills
  • Fever higher than 101 degrees F (38.3 C)
  • A flushed face
  • Headaches
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pale skin around the lips
  • Red lines/streaks around the armpits, elbows, and knees
  • Red and sore throat with white and yellow patches
  • Strawberry tongue/a white tongue with red dots on the surface
  • Swollen glands in the back of the neck
  • Swollen tonsils

Risk factors for scarlet fever may include:

  • Being five to 15 years old, although older children and adults can still develop scarlet fever. However, the condition rarely occurs among children younger than two years old due to maternal antibodies.
  • Overcrowded conditions, such as dormitories, institutional settings, or schools.

Body systems harmed by scarlet fever

While rare, scarlet fever may cause the following complications:

  • Abscesses – Pockets of pus in the throat.
  • Arthritis – Joint inflammation.
  • Kidney disease/post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis – Inflammation of the kidneys.
  • Otitis media – Ear infections.
  • Pneumonia – Lung infection.
  • Rheumatic fever – An inflammatory disease that may affect the brain, heart, joints, and skin.
  • Skin infections

Food items or nutrients that may prevent scarlet fever

The following foods or nutrients can help prevent scarlet fever or address its side effects:

  • Apple cider vinegar (ACV) – Add some ACV and a couple of teaspoons of cayenne pepper to a glass of water. Mix well, heat, and drink the mixture. Drink the mixture at least two to three times daily to ease a sore throat caused by scarlet fever.
  • Honey – Add two to three teaspoons of honey to a glass of water. Mix and heat for about 15 minutes. Drink the mixture at least thrice a day. Alternatively, you can take one to two teaspoons of honey daily.
  • Mint – To make mint tea, add two to three mint leaves in a cup of water. Heat for 30 minutes then let the mixture steep. Strain before drinking. Drink at least three cups of mint tea daily.
  • Raspberry – To make raspberry tea, add some raspberry leaves to a cup of water. Heat it for 10 minutes, then let the mixture steep. Strain before drinking. Consume at least two cups of tea every day to ease a sore throat.

Treatments, management plans for scarlet fever

Treatment for scarlet fever includes medications that can help address the pain associated with a sore throat.

Other remedies include eating ice popsicles or warm soup. Patients with scarlet fever can also gargle with salt water or use a cool air humidifier to soothe a sore throat. Individuals with the condition must also drink lots of fluids to prevent dehydration.

Where to learn more

Summary

Scarlet fever is an infectious disease caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. It is identified by a rash that looks like a sunburn with a sandpaper-like texture and fever.

Aside from a skin rash, the side effects of scarlet fever usually include chills, fever, a flushed face, and headaches.

While rare, scarlet fever may cause complications like abscesses, arthritis, and kidney disease.

Treatment for scarlet fever includes medications that can help address the pain associated with a sore throat. Other remedies include eating ice popsicles or warm soup.

Sources include:

MedicineNet.com

Healthline.com

CDC.gov

FindHomeRemedy.com



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