Psoriasis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Tuesday, June 12, 2018 by

Psoriasis is a long-term autoimmune condition that causes rapid buildup of skin cells, which leads to scaling on the surface of the skin. Skin cells have a life cycle, which normally takes around 21 to 28 days. However, in psoriasis, this process speeds up and only takes two to six days. As a result, cells that are not completely mature build up rapidly on the surface of the skin. This results in red, flaky, crusty patches covered with silvery scales on the skin.

Scales usually occurs on joints, such as elbows and knees, but may also develop anywhere on the body, including the hands, feet, neck, scalp, and face. Less common types of psoriasis affect the nails, mouth, and the area around the genitals.

The cause of psoriasis is unclear, but genetics and immune system are two key factors. This condition is not infectious and most people are affected only in small patches on their body. It can develop at any age, but most often occurs between the ages of 11 and 45. The severity of psoriasis differs from person to person. For some, it may be just a minor irritation, but for others, it has greatly affected their quality of life.

There are five types of psoriasis:

Known symptoms of psoriasis

The signs of psoriasis vary from person to person and depend on the type of psoriasis. The most common symptoms of plaque psoriasis include red, raised, inflamed patches of skin; whitish-silver scales or plaques on the red patches; dry skin that may crack and bleed; soreness around patches; itching and burning sensations around patches; thick, pitted nails; and painful, swollen joints.

Body systems harmed by psoriasis

The body system harmed by is the integumentary system as it affects the skin cells.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent psoriasis

There is no information on what foods prevent psoriasis. However, there are some foods that can help treat and manage the condition. These include fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, sardines, and albacore tuna; carrots and squash; grains, such as whole-grain bread, cereal, and pasta; oatmeal; and brown rice; lean meats; nuts; avocados; and blueberries.

Treatments, management plans for psoriasis

There is no cure for psoriasis, so its treatments’ main goal is to improve its symptoms, such as reducing inflammation and scales, slowing down the growth of skin cells, and removing plaques. Treatment options for psoriasis include topical treatments, such as topical corticosteroids, topical retinoids, anthralin, vitamin D analogues, salicyclic acid, and moisturizer; systemic medications; and light therapy. To avoid making your psoriasis worse, refrain from eating spicy foods, tomatoes, dairy products, sugary cereals, frozen dinners, alcohol, and gluten. There are also natural remedies to treat psoriasis. These include managing stress naturally, quitting smoking, applying topical natural remedies like aloe vera, apple cider vinegar, and Epsom salt, getting physically fit, and acupuncture.

Where to learn more

Summary

Psoriasis is a long-term autoimmune condition that causes rapid buildup of skin cells.

Psoriasis causes red, raised, inflamed patches of skin; whitish-silver scales or plaques on the red patches; dry skin that may crack and bleed; soreness around patches; itching and burning sensations around patches; thick, pitted nails; and painful, swollen joints.

Psoriasis can be treated with topical treatments, such as topical corticosteroids, topical retinoids, anthralin, vitamin D analogues, salicyclic acid, and moisturizer; systemic medications; and light therapy.

Sources include:

Healthline.com 1

Healthline.com 2

HSE.ie

Health.com

RD.com

CureJoy.com



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