Ocular melanoma – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, May 24, 2018 by

Ocular melanoma, also known as uveal melanoma, is a type of cancer that develops when cells known as melanocytes, which provide pigment and color to the iris, mutate and form tumors. These tumors can form in the iris or in other parts of the eye’s middle layer, known as the uvea or the uveal tract. Ocular melanoma is related to subcutaneous melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

It may be the most common type of eye cancer, but it is not widespread. In total, the incidence rate is around five to six people per million. It affects less than 3,000 people in the U.S. every year.

Unlike subcutaneous melanoma, exposure to solar rays has not been shown to increase the risk of uveal melanoma. In fact, the cause of ocular melanoma remains unknown. However, there are a few risk factors for ocular melanoma. These include being Caucasian, having blond or red hair, and having light-colored eyes.

Known side effects of ocular melanoma

Ocular melanoma does not exhibit many side effects in its earliest stages. Moreover, it tends to develop in areas of the eye that you cannot actually see, which means that you may not know you have it until the cancer progresses.

The possible side effects of ocular melanoma include: a dark spot in the iris that gets bigger; a displacement of the eye within the eye socket; seeing flashing lights; watery eyes; and poor or blurry vision or loss of peripheral vision in one eye.

Floaters or small specks or squiggles that move about in the patient’s field of vision may also be present. Floaters may be seen more clearly when looking at a plain background, such as a blank wall. They may appear as tiny dot, circles, lines, clouds, or cobwebs. However, floaters are common, especially as people age, and they do not necessarily indicate cancer. In rare cases, pain in or around the eye can also be a side effect of ocular melanoma.

Body systems harmed by ocular melanoma

The body system harmed by ocular melanoma is the ocular system.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent ocular melanoma

There is no information on what foods or nutrients prevent ocular melanoma. However, there are some foods that boost eye health. These include the following:

  • Beef
  • Citrus fruits and berries, such as oranges, grapefruits, lemons
  • Cold-water fish such as salmon, tuna, sardines, and mackerel that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids
  • Colorful fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, tomatoes, bell peppers, strawberries, pumpkin, and cantaloupe
  • Eggs
  • Leafy green vegetables, such as spinach, kale, and collard greens that are rich in lutein and zeaxanthin
  • Legumes, such as kidney beans, black-eyed peas, and lentils
  • Nuts, such as pistachios, walnuts, and almonds
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Whole grains, such as quinoa, brown rice, whole oats, and whole-wheat bread

Treatments, management plans for ocular melanoma

Treatment for ocular melanoma depends on the size and location of the tumor. The main treatments for this type of cancer include brachytherapy, external radiotherapy, surgery to remove the tumor or part of the eye, and removal of the eye.

Where to learn more

Summary

Ocular melanoma is cancer that develops when melanocytes, which provide pigment and color to the iris, mutate and form tumors.

Ocular melanoma causes a dark spot in the iris that gets bigger; a displacement of the eye within the eye socket; seeing flashing lights; watery eyes; poor or blurry vision or loss of peripheral vision in one eye; floaters; or pain in the or around the eye.

Ocular melanoma can be treated with brachytherapy, external radiotherapy, surgery to remove the tumor or part of the eye, and removal of the eye.

Sources include:

Health.com

Prevention.com

MedicalNewsToday.com

AllAboutVision.com

NHS.uk



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