Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Friday, July 20, 2018 by

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a disease that involves reduced kidney function. Patients with this rare condition have been exposed to an intravenous contrast material with gadolinium.

A contrast material is a dye that is usually applied when an individual requires magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

NSF is characterized by fibrosis, or the thickening and hardening of the skin, subcutaneous tissues, and, in some cases, the underlying skeletal muscle. A patient’s arms and legs are most often affected by fibrosis.

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is also called gadolinium-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

Known symptoms of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

The signs and symptoms of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis can vary depending on the affected organs and these organs can be suffer severe damage.

The symptoms of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis usually include fibrosis in the internal organs like the brain, heart, liver, and lungs:

  • Brain fibrosis may result in neurological symptoms.
  • Liver fibrosis can cause the inflammation and scarring of the liver.
  • Lung fibrosis can cause chest pain, cough, and shortness of breath.

NFS can also affect a patient’s eye, joints, muscles, and skin. When NFS affects the skin, the condition is called nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy (NFD).

  • If NFS affects the joints, patients may experience joint pain. If it affects the muscles, the muscles may function poorly.
  • Itchy and painful skin lesions that look like nodules or plaques can appear on the lower extremities.
  • When the kidney is affected because of kidney disease, patients with NFD may suffer from cognitive function decline, malnutrition, peripheral edema, and other symptoms.

Risk factors for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis may include:

  • Exposure to gadolinium.
  • Having a hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection
  • Kidney failure, which may require dialysis
  • Undergoing systemic immunosuppressive therapy for different reasons

Body systems harmed by nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis may cause the following complications:

  • Emotional and psychological stress
  • Exposure to gadolinium can worsen the existing renal condition of patients
  • Fibrosis that affects important organs like the brain, heart, liver, and lungs
  • Secondary skin infections

Food items or nutrients that may prevent nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

Honey and turmeric can help prevent nephrogenic systemic fibrosis or address its symptoms.

Mix two teaspoons of honey and turmeric in a glass of milk. Drink the mixture at least thrice a day. Honey and turmeric have anti-inflammatory properties, and both can help in regression of fibrosis of the tissue, specifically in muscle tissue and the skin.

Treatments, management plans for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis can be difficult to treat, but some newer monoclonal antibody treatments have helped some patients with the condition. Healthcare professionals may also recommend symptomatic treatment, depending on the affected organ.

Other treatment measures that can help a patient address symptoms that affect the skin include:

  • Maintain cleanliness and proper hygiene.
  • Undertaking treatment to address any underlying disorders or conditions.
  • Using moisturizers or other lotions that can prevent the skin from drying.
  • Using of topical steroidal creams and lotions.

Where to learn more

Summary

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a disease that involves reduced kidney function. Patients with the rare condition have been exposed to an intravenous contrast material with contains gadolinium.

The symptoms of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis usually include fibrosis in the internal organs like the brain, heart, liver, and lungs.

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis may cause complications like emotional and psychological stress, fibrosis, and secondary skin infection.

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis can be difficult to treat, but some newer monoclonal antibody treatments have helped some patients with the condition. Healthcare professionals may also recommend symptomatic treatment, depending on the affected organ.

Sources include:

RareDiseases.org

DoveMedSource.com

Simple-Remedies.com



Comments

comments powered by Disqus