Molluscum contagiosum – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, May 31, 2018 by

Molluscum contagiosum is a skin infection caused by the virus Molluscum contagiosum. Infected individuals develop painless bumps, or papules, on their skin. The bumps disappear on their own and rarely leave scars even without treatment.

Molluscum contagiosum mainly affects infants and young children; adolescents and adults are less often affected. It is more common in warmer climates and overcrowded places.

The infection is worse in children with atopic eczema, as well as in individuals with weakened immune systems due to other infections.

There are several ways it can spread:

  • Direct skin contact
  • Indirect contact (shared items)
  • Entering another site by scratching or shaving
  • Sexual transmission

The infection is more likely to be transmitted in wet conditions, such as when children bathe or swim together.

Known symptoms, risk factors for molluscum contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum causes small groups of painless skin bumps/papules. They are usually:

  • Very small and smooth
  • Flesh-, white- or pink-colored
  • Firm and shaped like a dome with a dent or dimple in the middle
  • Filled with a central core of waxy material
  • Between the size of pinhead and the size of a pencil eraser
  • Present anywhere (except on the palms and soles) specifically on the face, abdomen, torso, arms, and legs (children), or the inner thigh, genitals, and abdomen (adults)

Anyone can get molluscum contagiosum, but the following are the ones who are more susceptible to contracting it:

  • Children between the ages of one and 10
  • People who live in tropical climates
  • People with weakened immune systems
  • People who have atopic dermatitis (eczema)
  • People who participate in contact sports with bare skin-to-skin contact

Body systems harmed by molluscum contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum generally causes no long-term problems, and the growths usually leave no marks.

People with weakened immune systems can sometimes get a more serious form of molluscum contagiosum. They typically have bigger and more papules, especially on the face. The bumps look different, and usually are more difficult to treat. A healthcare provider might prescribe medicines to strengthen the immune system.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent molluscum contagiosum

Some home remedies for molluscum contagiosum include the use of neem oil, apple cider vinegar, tea tree oil, coconut oil, oregano oil, allicin, alcohol, and duct tape occlusion.

Avoiding any direct skin contact, as well as contact with items touched by an infected person, can reduce your chances of getting the disease. Abstaining from sexual relations or using protection such as condoms can prevent some adults from contracting the disease, although the areas not covered by condoms can still be infected.

Treatments, management plans for molluscum contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum can be treated with the following methods:

  • Curettage: This involves scraping the papules away using a curet, a spoon-shaped instrument with a sharp edge.
  • Cryotherapy: This uses pressurized liquid spray to freeze the bumps. Each papule is frozen for up to 10 seconds, or until a layer of ice forms over it and the surrounding skin.
  • Diathermy: This uses a heated electrical device to burn off the papules under a local anesthetic.
  • Laser therapy: This uses intense, narrow beams of light to treat the infection.

Where to learn more

Summary

Molluscum contagiosum is a skin infection caused by the virus Molluscum contagiosum. Infected individuals develop painless bumps, or papules, on their skin. The bumps disappear on their own and rarely leave scars even without treatment.

Molluscum contagiosum mainly affects infants and young children; adolescents and adults are less often affected. It is more common in warmer climates and overcrowded places.

Sources include:

CDC.gov

DermNetNZ.org

HealthLine.com

MedicalNewsToday.com

KidsHealth.org

HomeRemedyShop.com

MedicineNet.com



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