Mitral valve disease – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, May 24, 2018 by

The term mitral valve disease is used for all adverse conditions that affect the mitral valve – one of the two main valves on the left side of the heart. In particular, the mitral valve regulates blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle in diastole and prevents it from going back during systole.

There are three types of mitral valve disease:

  • Mitral stenosis is when the opening of the mitral valve becomes narrow, which impairs the flow of blood to the left ventricle during diastole. The condition is usually caused by rheumatic heart disease, a condition where the heart valves are damaged following rheumatic fever.
  • Mitral regurgitation is the leakage of blood from the left ventricle to the left atrium in systole. If the condition persists, it can result in damage to the heart.
  • Mitral valve prolapse happens when the valves do not close tightly, causing a “floppy” valve. In some cases, this may lead to mitral regurgitation as blood will flow back into the atrium.

Known risk factors and symptoms of mitral valve disease

Certain people are at risk of getting mitral valve disease. These include older adults, those who have infections which affected the heart, those who have had a heart attack or a cardiovascular disease, and individuals who have had a history of use with certain drugs. In some cases, especially for mitral valve prolapse, this may have been present at birth.

For the most part, some people with a mitral valve disease do not experience any symptoms. Those who do, however, may differ in exhibited symptoms, depending on the which condition is present.

In general, symptoms may include the following:

  • Coughing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Dizziness
  • Swollen feet and legs
  • Fatigue

Body systems affected by mitral valve disease

In severe cases, mitral valve disease can lead to complications such as:

  • Atrial fibrillation (irregular heart rhythms in the atrium)
  • Pulmonary hypertension (High blood pressure that affects the lungs)
  • Blood clots
  • Heart failure and stroke

Food items or nutrients that may prevent or relieve mitral valve disease

Currently, there aren’t any diets that cater to managing mitral valve disease; however, an article published by the Cleveland Clinic lists some food items that may help reduce the likelihood of developing cardiovascular diseases, in general, of which mitral valve disease is part of.

These include:

  • Fish that are high in omega-3 like salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring, and trout
  • Healthy nuts such as almonds and walnuts
  • Berries, including blueberries, strawberries, cranberries, or raspberries
  • Flaxseed which contains omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, and phytoestrogens that support heart health
  • Oatmeal
  • Dark beans like kidney and black beans
  • A glass of red wine (two four-ounce glasses for men, and one for women per day)
  • Red, yellow, and orange vegetables including carrots, sweet potatoes, red peppers, and acorn squash

Treatment and management options for mitral valve disease

In cases of mitral valve disease that don’t have symptoms, treatment may not be required. Depending on the severity of the condition, healthcare professionals may either opt for medication or even surgery.

Where to learn more

Summary

Mitral valve disease covers all adverse conditions that affect the mitral valve, a part of the heart which blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle. Older adults, those who have infections which affected the heart, those who have had a heart attack or a cardiovascular disease, and individuals who have had a history of use with certain drugs, in particular, have an increased risk of getting the condition.

For the most part, mitral valve disease is asymptomatic and do not need treatment. However, depending on the severity of the condition, healthcare professionals may either opt for medication or even surgery.

Sources include:

MayoClinic.org

ClevelandClinicMedEd.com

Health.ClevelandClinic.org

MedLinePlus.gov

NHS.uk



Comments

comments powered by Disqus