Mesenteric panniculitis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, May 17, 2018 by

Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare disease that involves the section of the mesentery that consists of fat cells.

The mesentery is an endless fold of tissue in the abdomen that supports the intestines and attaches them to the abdominal wall of the body.

While the exact cause of mesenteric panniculitis remains unknown, experts believe that it could be linked to abdominal surgery, autoimmune disease, bacterial infection, injury to the abdomen, or vascular problems. The disease results in chronic inflammation that harms the fatty tissue in the mesentery. This can gradually cause scarring on the mesentery.

Mesenteric panniculitis is also known as mesenteric lipodystrophy, retractile mesenteritis, and sclerosing mesenteritis.

Known symptoms of mesenteric panniculitis

The signs and symptoms of mesenteric panniculitis usually vary from one individual to another. Not all patients experience side effects of the disease while some may only have very mild symptoms.

Depending on the extent of inflammation in the mesentery, the swelling may put pressure on organs near the intestines. This pressure can result in abdominal pain.

Other common signs of mesenteric panniculitis may include:

  • Appetite loss
  • Bloating
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Immediately feeling full after eating
  • Lump in the abdomen
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Weight loss

Risk factors for mesenteric panniculitis may include:

  • Abdominal surgery or trauma to the abdomen
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Cancer
  • Infection (e.g., dysentery, malaria, rheumatic fever, typhoid fever, etc.)

Body systems harmed by mesenteric panniculitis

Mesenteric panniculitis may cause complications like small bowel obstruction or acute abdomen in some individuals. A small bowel obstruction can prevent the passage of food via the intestines, and this may result in various “nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms” and even as a nutrient malabsorption.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent mesenteric panniculitis

The following foods or nutrients can help prevent mesenteric panniculitis and improve digestion:

  • Bananas – Bananas are full of fiber and they can help facilitate normal bowel function, especially if you have diarrhea. The fruit also contains electrolytes and potassium.
  • Ginger – Ginger can relieve gas, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting.
  • Kimchi – Kimchi is made with cabbage, which can help promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the colon. Cabbage is also a kind of fiber that’s not digested, which helps it get rid of waste that can keep bowel movements regular. Kimchi is spicy, so avoid it if your digestive problems are triggered by spicy foods.
  • Lean meat and fish – Unlike beef, lean meat and fish are easier to digest.
  • Whole grains – Whole grains like brown rice, oats, and whole-wheat bread are full of fiber that can aid proper digestion.

Treatments, management plans for mesenteric panniculitis

Most patients with mesenteric panniculitis don’t require treatment. The disease often resolves itself after several weeks or months.

If the side effects of the disease cause complications, a healthcare professional can prescribe medications that can bring down inflammation. Some medications used to treat mesenteric panniculitis suppress the overactive immune system response. Corticosteroid drugs are usually administered to treat the disease.

Other medicines used to treat mesenteric panniculitis may include:

  • Azathioprine (Imuran)
  • Colchicine (Colcrys)
  • Cyclophosphamide
  • Infliximab (Remicade)
  • Naltrexone (Revia), but at a low dose
  • Pentoxifylline
  • Thalidomide (Thalomid)

Where to learn more

Summary

Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare disease that involves the section of the mesentery that consists of fat cells.

The common symptoms of mesenteric panniculitis may include appetite loss, bloating, or constipation.

Mesenteric panniculitis may cause complications like small bowel obstruction or acute abdomen in some individuals.

Bananas, ginger, kimchi, lean meat and fish, and whole grains can help prevent mesenteric panniculitis and improve digestion.

Most patients with mesenteric panniculitis don’t require treatment. The disease often resolves itself after several weeks or months. Some medications used to treat mesenteric panniculitis suppress the overactive immune system response. Corticosteroid drugs are usually administered to treat the disease.

Sources include

Healthline.com

RareDiseases.org

MyClevelandClinic.org

Health.com



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