Inflammatory Bowel Diseases – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, May 03, 2018 by

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are conditions that pertain to chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In particular, two conditions compose IBD:

In general, IBDs are debilitating and can lead to life-threatening conditions.

Known risk factors and symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases

In general, symptoms of IBD include the following.

  • Localized pain, cramps, or swelling, usually in the abdomen
  • Chronic or bloody diarrhea
  • Loss of weight
  • Extreme fatigue

A person with IBD may not have all of these symptoms, or they may have added ones like fever, vomiting, and anemia (a lack of healthy red blood cells).

When a person has IBD, the symptoms come and go. In the flare-up period, the symptoms can be severe and debilitating, followed by a long remission period where there are little to no symptoms at all.

Body systems affected by inflammatory bowel diseases

In severe cases of IBD, the inflammation in the intestine may extend beyond the inner lining. This may result in ulcers and bleeding of the affected area. In some cases, a condition called toxic megacolon occurs, where the colon loses its ability to contract properly. It may also account for intestinal scarring called strictures. When the inflammation spreads, this may lead to nutrient malabsorption and bacterial overgrowth. According to some studies, chronic cases of inflammation is linked to colon cancer.

Complications because of IBD are not limited to the digestive tract alone. In some cases, this may also cause arthritis, eye problems, skin rashes, and even liver disease.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent or relieve inflammatory bowel diseases

Most people live relatively normal lives, despite having an IBD. However, it pays to learn which food items could increase the chances of flare-ups, or even intensifies it at its onset, and avoid it.

  • Dairy products – This food group is difficult to digest because of its lactose content, as well as the presence of added sugars. If a person consumes too much lactose, this can either cause or worsen diarrhea.
  • Spicy foods – These food items trigger the digestive system. If a person is experiencing nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea because of IBD, spicy foods make these conditions that much worse.
  • Fatty foods – Eating a lot of food items that have a high amount of fat can stimulate contractions in the GIT, worsening diarrhea.
  • Fried foods – Similar to fatty foods, these food items move, undigested, through the body. In addition, they are low in fiber and take longer to digest.
  • Processed foods – The preservatives and artificial coloring in these food items trigger allergies or sensitivities, especially to those with GIT trouble such as IBD.

Treatment, management options for inflammatory bowel diseases

To treat IBDs, healthcare professionals will first look at reducing inflammation that can worsen the condition. At best, this can lead to long-term remission and reduced risks of complications. The most common ways to treat it involve either medication or surgery.

In drug therapy, medications such as anti-inflammatory drugs and immune system suppressors may be given to reduce inflammation caused by the condition. If there is an infection, antibiotics may be used to address the condition. Other medications are provided as needed to help relieve symptoms as they come.

When diet, lifestyle changes, and drug therapy are ineffective against IBDs, surgery is recommended. Depending on the case, this may either remove a portion of the intestine or the whole colon and rectum. However, in Chron’s disease, the benefit of surgery is only temporary, with the disease recurring near reconnected tissue.

Where to learn more

Summary

Inflammatory bowel diseases are conditions that pertain to chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The disease is debilitating and can lead to life-threatening conditions.

When a person has IBD, symptoms come and go. In the flare-up period, the symptoms can be severe and debilitating, followed by an extended remission period where there are little to no symptoms at all. In severe cases, the inflammation in the intestine may extend beyond the inner lining. This may result in ulcers and bleeding of the affected area and even colon cancer.

Complications because of IBD are not limited to the digestive tract alone. In some cases, this may also cause arthritis, eye problems, skin rashes, and even liver disease.

Sources include:

MayoClinic.org 1

MayoClinic.org 2

MedLinePlus.gov 1

MedLinePlus.gov 2

NHS.uk

MedicineNet.com

EverydayHealth.com



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