Familial adenomatous polyposis – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 by

Colon

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is the name of a hereditary disorder that causes cancer of the colon (large intestine) and rectum. Patients diagnosed with the classic type of FAP often develop hundreds to thousands of benign (noncancerous) polyps in the colon at a young age, such as their teenage years.

Polyps refer to the growths in the colon of an individual with FAP.

In time, these polyps in the colon may become malignant or cancerous, and this can cause early-onset colorectal cancer in patients at least 39 years old.

Some patients may develop a milder form of FAP called attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP). AFAP is commonly characterized by the growth of fewer colon polyps (at least 30), along with a delay in the development of colon cancer by about 10 to 15 years.

FAP occurs when then are changes or mutations in the APC gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Individuals with FAP often go through regular screening until they develop 20 to 30 polyps. When this happens, a colectomy, or the removal of the colon, is usually recommended.

Colon

Known side effects of familial adenomatous polyposis

The know side effects and symptoms of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are often different both within families and between families.

The side effects of classic FAP are the growth of hundreds to thousands of noncancerous polyps in the colon in patients as young as 16 years old.

The other side effects of FAP may include:

  • Adenomatous (benign tumors of glandular tissue) polyps of the small intestines
  • Adrenal masses (an abnormal growth that develops in the adrenal gland)
  • Benign skin abnormalities
  • Congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (the appearance of a flat and pigmented spot within the outer layer of the retina)
  • Dental abnormalities
  • Desmoid tumors (noncancerous growths in the connective tissue)
  • Fundic gland/adenomatous polyps of the stomach
  • Osteomas (benign bone tumors)
  • Other types of cancer (e.g., adrenal gland, bile ducts, central nervous system, liver, pancreas, small bowel, stomach, and thyroid)

Body systems harmed by familial adenomatous polyposis

The complications of familial adenomatous polyposis may include:

  • Adenomatous polyps may develop into colon cancer
  • Patients with FAP may also develop desmoid tumors that can affect abdominal organs
  • The polyps may bleed and cause anemia

Food items or nutrients that may prevent familial adenomatous polyposis

The following foods and nutrients may help prevent familial adenomatous polyposis:

  • Curcumin – Curcumin, the bright yellow pigment in turmeric, contains antioxidants. According to a study, curcumin extract may delay advanced colorectal cancer in patients.
  • Lactobacillus casei Lactobacillus casei can help minimize the recurrence of colorectal tumors in individuals who have already undergone surgery for colon cancer.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids – Omega-3 fatty acids can help minimize the growth of colon cancer cells. Do take note that omega-3 fatty acids may increase the risk of bleeding, but there isn’t enough evidence of significant bleeding risk at lower doses.
  • Psyllium – Including psyllium in your diet can help reduce the risk for colon cancer. Do take note that psyllium can cause severe allergic reactions such as anaphylaxis, hives, and skin rash.

Treatments, management plans for familial adenomatous polyposis

There is no cure for familial adenomatous polyposis since it is a genetic condition. However, efforts to control the complications due to FAP include various treatments such as:

  • Surgical removal of desmoid tumors.
  • Prophylactic colectomy or the prophylactic removal of the colon of patients with FAP may help minimize the chances of developing colon cancer.
  • Prescription drugs may help minimize number and size of the polyps.
  • Colon cancer may be cured via a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy depending on the patient’s condition.

Where to learn more

Summary

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is the name of a hereditary disorder that causes cancer of the colon (large intestine) and rectum. Patients diagnosed with the classic type of FAP often develop hundreds to thousands of benign (noncancerous) polyps in the colon at a young age, such as their teenage years.

The know side effects and symptoms of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are often different both within families and between families.

The side effects of classic FAP are the growth of hundreds to thousands of noncancerous polyps in the colon in patients as young as 16 years old.

The other side effects of FAP may include adenomatous polyps of the small intestines, adrenal masses, benign skin abnormalities, and dental abnormalities.

Adding curcumin, Lactobacillus casei, omega-3 fatty acids, and psyllium may help prevent familial adenomatous polyposis.

There is no cure for familial adenomatous polyposis since it is a genetic condition. However, efforts to control the complications due to FAP include various methods such as surgery, prophylactic colectomy, medication, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

Sources include

RareDiseases.INFO.NIH.gov

DoveMed.com

NutritionFacts.org

SimplyGoodNaturalFoods.com



Comments

comments powered by Disqus