Common variable immunodeficiency – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Thursday, February 22, 2018 by

Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a condition that impairs the immune system. A person with CVID cannot make antibodies that can fight infection.

In turn, this makes them prone to recurring infections, particularly in the lungs, sinuses, and ears. Later, the risk of infection becomes more severe, especially in the respiratory and digestive systems. Complications with CVID will lead to blood disorders and cancer, of which lymphoma is a common cause of death.

While the main risk factor of CVID is a family history of the condition, it can happen to anyone, regardless of their family history, and the etiology of the disease is unknown. However, scientists believe that genetic factors that are linked to CVID include mutations in the genes that are involved in the development and function of the immune system.

Known risk factors and symptoms of common variable immunodeficiency

Signs and symptoms of CVID may appear as early as childhood or adolescence; however, these are more common during adulthood.

During childhood, the following signs and symptoms may appear:

  • An infection that keeps coming back. This can be anywhere in the eyes, skin, ears, sinuses, and lungs.
  • Inflammation in the joints of the knees, ankles, elbows, or wrists.
  • Stomach and bowel problems.

Three complications must be observed in patients with CVID:

  • Recurrent infections – Prolonged exposure a condition (such as bronchitis) may lead to permanent damage to the organs and increase the risk of complications.
  • Autoimmune phenomena – Patients with CVID also have other autoimmune conditions. These can include anywhere from rheumatoid arthritis, vitiligo, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, pyoderma gangrenosum, to even gastrointestinal diseases.
  • Malignancy – Some conditions that should be monitored include the development of lymphomas.

Moreover, people with CVID may have granular, inflammatory nodules (noncaseating granulomas) within tissues of the skin, lungs, spleen, and liver.

Body systems affected by common variable immunodeficiency

CVID primarily affects the immune system, but its complications hit all organ systems.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent or relieve common variable immunodeficiency

Proper diet can aid the body in boosting its immune system and managing the condition. Here are some recommended dietary habits.

  • Eating fresh fruit and vegetables as much as you can.
  • Cutting back on fatty foods and added sugars.
  • Adding more yellow- and orange-colored foods such as yellow squash, carrots, red peppers, and tomatoes for their nutrients such as alpha-carotene and beta-carotene.
  • Having more protein in your diet by consuming white meat, fish, and eggs.
  • Including foods rich in flavonoids such as berries, garlic, and yogurt.

Treatment and management options for common variable immunodeficiency

The main treatment for CVID is intravenous immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy, which is known to cut down cases of recurrent infections. The procedure is effective for most people; however, a person with symptoms of gastrointestinal disease coupled with CVID may show little improvement with Ig replacement therapy. In this case, steroids and other immunosuppressive drugs are augmented with the therapy.

Where to learn more

Summary

Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a condition that impairs the immune system. This makes them prone to recurring infections, particularly in the lungs, sinuses, and ears. Later, the risk of infection becomes more severe, especially in the respiratory and digestive systems. Complications with CVID will lead to blood disorders and cancer, of which lymphoma is a common cause of death.

While the main risk factor of CVID is a family history of the condition, it can happen to anyone, regardless of their family history, and the etiology of the disease is unknown.

CVID primarily affects the immune system, but its complications hit all organ systems. Still, proper diet can aid the body in boosting its immune system and managing the condition.

Sources include:

GHR.NLM.NIH.gov

eMedicine.Medscape.com 1

eMedicine.Medscape.com 2

MayoClinic.org

Cedars-Sinai.org

RareDiseases.org

Home-Remedies-for-You.com



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