Black Death – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Friday, January 12, 2018 by

Black Death, also called the plague, is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria known as Yersinia pestis. It has a high fatality rate, and Black Death has been around for centuries.

In the Middle Ages, the plague was known as the “Black Death.” It caused the death of 60 percent of Europe’s population during a pandemic, or an epidemic of human disease that has spread through a large geographic area.

Black Death spreads through fleas that have fed on infected animals (e.g. rats, ground squirrels, mice, etc.). There are three forms of Black Death in humans: bubonic plague, septicemic plague, and pneumonic plague.

There is no commercially available vaccine against Black Death, and it can be found in low levels in animals in the southwestern U.S.

Known side effects of Black Death

The signs and symptoms of Black Death associated with its three forms are:

  1. Bubonic plague – Bacteria infiltrates the lymph nodes and causes buboes, or “enlarged, painful, tender lymph nodes.” Other symptoms are fever, chills, headaches, and weakness.
  2. Septicemic plague – Plague bacteria enters the bloodstream. This can occur on its own, or it may develop from bubonic plague. Symptoms include fever, chills, weakness, abdominal pain, and shock. There can be bleeding and tissue death, especially in the fingers and toes. These dying tissues may turn black, hence the name Black Death.
  3. Pneumonic plague – While symptoms of other types of plague may be observed, the “characteristic clinical picture of pneumonia is present.” The plague bacteria spreads to the lungs or infects the lungs directly when infected droplets in the air are inhaled. Pneumonic plague is the only form of plague that can be transmitted from person to person. Symptoms may include shortness of breath, chest pain, fever, and cough with watery or bloody mucus production.

Body systems harmed by Black Death

In bubonic plague, the bacteria can travel through the lymphatic system, which will cause more inflamed lymph nodes, especially in the groin, armpits, and neck. Occasionally, plague can spread to the central nervous system and cause meningitis, or an inflammation of the membranes around the brain and spinal cord.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent Black Death

The following foods or nutrients can help prevent Black Death:

  • Garlic – Garlic contains the chemical allicin. It also has antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-fungal properties.
  • Turmeric – Turmeric contains curcumin, which helps decrease inflammation.
  • Oregano oil – Oregano helps get rid of the bacteria that causes the plague.
  • Ginger – Aside from its anti-bacterial properties, ginger increases your immune system and counters many allergic reactions.

Treatments, management plans for Black Death

If healthcare professionals suspect that a patient has the plague, they will wear proper protective gear (e.g. goggles, gloves, gowns, and masks) before dealing with them.

  • Patients will be isolated so they can’t infect others.
  • Patients who may need help breathing are given oxygen.
  • They are kept away from others for two to three days after antibiotic treatment starts or once the infection is cleared.
  • Some patients may experience some degree of septic shock (low blood pressure), and specialists will closely monitor this in an intensive care unit.
  • Antibiotics must be given early in the infection to maximize the chance of the antibiotics killing Y. pestis bacteria. These antibiotics might include streptomycin sulfate combined with tetracycline and other antibiotics.

Where to learn more

Summary

Black Death, also called the plague, is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria known as Yersinia pestis. It has a high fatality rate, and has been around for centuries.

There is no commercially available vaccine against Black Death, and it can be found in low levels in animals in the southwestern U.S.

Sources include

MedicineNet.com

EverydayHealth.com

LiveALittleLonger.com

EMedicineHealth.com



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