Argentine hemorrhagic fever – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, January 03, 2018 by

Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is caused by the Junin virus and it is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease.

The Arenaviridae are a family of viruses with members generally associated with rodent-transmitted diseases in humans. Arenavirus infections are relatively common in humans in some areas of the world and they cause severe illnesses.

Junin virus, isolated in 1958, was the first arenavirus to be recognized. This virus spread AHF in a limited agricultural area of the pampas in Argentina.

The corn mouse, Calomys musculinus, is the reservoir of AHF. The disease is transmitted when particles from corn mouse urine or saliva are aerosolized and inhaled. In humans, the pathophysiology of the Junin virus is yet to be fully understood.

Known side effects of Argentine hemorrhagic fever

AHF infection is often mild or subclinical. Initial side effects of AHF may include:

  • Fever
  • Malaise
  • Dizziness
  • Myalgias/muscle pain
  • Skin dysesthesia/abnormal sense of touch
  • Oral ulcerations
  • Llymphadenopathy
  • Chest pain
  • Back pain
  • Abdominal pain
  • Sore throat
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Cough
  • Photophobia
  • Conjunctival redness
  • Facial flushing
  • Small axillary petechiae

These symptoms usually last from seven to 14 days and recovery begins by the end of the second week of illness.

Body systems harmed by Argentine hemorrhagic fever

Severe cases of AHF may progress to:

  • Shock
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Diffuse mucosal hemorrhaging
  • Meningoencephalitis with convulsions

As the disease progresses, the patient may develop a high fever, dehydration, hypotension, flushed skin, abnormally slow heartbeat, bleeding from the gums and internal tissues, hematuria, and hematemesis.

AHF symptoms may involve the central nervous system. Pleural effusion (“water on the lungs”), ascites, and deafness are rare complications of AHF. Person-to-person transmission is possible, and this can occur via contact with infected body fluids and tissue.

The role of airborne transmission of the Junin virus between individuals is unclear. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has designated Argentine HF as a Category A bioterrorism agent.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent Argentine hemorrhagic fever

The therapies below have been studied for use in viral infections in general and must be used only under the supervision of a qualified healthcare provider:

  • Astragalus – Astragalus products are derived from the roots of Astragalus membranaceus or related species, which are native to China. In traditional Chinese medicine, astragalus is commonly found in mixtures with other herbs and is used in the treatment of numerous ailments, including heart, liver, and kidney diseases, as well as cancer, viral infections, and immune system disorders.
  • Blessed thistle – Blessed thistle leaves, stems, and flowers have traditionally been used in “bitter” tonic drinks and in other preparations taken orally to enhance appetite and digestion.
  • Green tea – Preliminary research suggests that green tea decreases the viral load in carriers of the HTLV-1 virus.
  • Sorrel – Sorrel is used with other herbs to treat bronchitis and sinus conditions in Germany since the 1930s.
  • Turmeric – The rhizome (root) of turmeric, Curcuma longa Linn, has long been used in traditional Asian medicine to treat gastrointestinal upset, arthritic pain, and “low energy”. Evidence suggests that turmeric may help treat viral infections.

Treatments, management plans for Argentine hemorrhagic fever

Patients diagnosed with viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF) receive supportive therapy, but generally, there is no other treatment or established cure for VHFs. Treatment with convalescent-phase plasma has been used with success in some patients with AHF.

Where to learn more

Summary

Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is caused by the Junin virus and it is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease.

The corn mouse, Calomys musculinus, is the reservoir of AHF. The disease is transmitted when particles from corn mouse urine or saliva are aerosolized and inhaled.

Initial side effects of AHF may include fever, malaise, dizziness, and myalgias/muscle pain.

Treatment with convalescent-phase plasma has been used with success in some patients with AHF.

 

Sources include:

Orpha.net

CDC.gov

VisualDX.com

Medical-Dictionary.TheFreeDictionary.com

FoodsForLiving.com

MedicineNet.com



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