Anosmia – causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, December 20, 2017 by

Anosmia is the failure of the development of or the loss of the sense of smell. This condition can be caused by certain conditions that destroy the nerve pathways that carry sensation from the nose to the brain. It is typically caused by a nasal condition or brain injury, yet some people are born without a sense of smell. The most common causes of anosmia include aging, nasal and/or sinus diseases, prior viral upper respiratory tract infections, and head trauma. Other possible cause of anosmia include common colds; chronic sinusitis; a nose abnormality, such as a crooked nose or a nasal septum that is not straight; hay fever that causes serious inflammation of the nasal passages; diabetes; long-term alcohol misuse; and an underactive thyroid. Anomia can also be caused by Cushing’s syndrome, exposure to a chemical that burns the inside of the nose, radiotherapy to the head and neck, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, kidney or liver disease, vitamin B12 deficiency, schizophrenia, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and sarcoidosis.

Known side effects of anosmia

There are at least 10 things that a person who loses his sense of smell may experience. One of these is the inability to taste food, which can lead to eating too much or eating too little. Many people with anosmia lose interest in food because 80 percent of the flavor of food comes from the smell. Another side effect of anosmia is the inability to smell spoiled food, which can lead to food poisoning. It can also increase the danger in case of fire because the smoke cannot be detected. Losing the ability to remember smell-related memories, loss of intimacy because of the inability to smell perfume or pheromones, and losing the ability to detect chemicals or other dangerous odors at home also come as complications of anosmia. A person with anosmia may also lack empathy from family, friends, or doctors, is unable to identify body odors, may suffer from mood disorders, such as depression, and may lack interest in social gatherings.

Body systems harmed by anosmia

The body systems harmed by anosmia include the respiratory, digestive and nervous systems.

List of foods or nutrients that prevent anosmia

According to an article published on the website EarthClinic.com, there are some home remedies that can help treat the loss of smell. These include:

  • Consuming 500 milligrams of L-Carnosine two to three times a day.
  • Consuming one to three tablespoons of cilantro or coriander once every two days.
  • Taking vitamin B50 once every two days.
  • Having two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar and a quarter teaspoon baking soda in a half of glass of water twice a day.

Other foods and ingredients that can help treat the loss of smell are garlic, lemon juice, castor oil, carom seed, pumpkin seeds, sweet potatoes, ginger syrup, bournvit, and foods rich in vitamin E.

Treatments, management plans for anosmia

Currently, there is no available cure or treatment for congenital anosmia, but there are types of this condition that can be improved or cured when the cause is treated. Anosmia can be treated depending on the condition. Treatments for anosmia may include nasal washing, an operation to have nasal polyps removed, a surgery to straighten the nasal septum, or a surgery to clear out the sinuses known as endoscopic sinus surgery. However, these treatments may be accompanied with side effects.

Where to learn more

Summary

Anosmia is the failure of the development of or the loss of the sense of smell.

Anosmia harms the respiratory, digestive and nervous systems.

Treatments for anosmia may include nasal washing, a surgery to have nasal polyps removed, a surgery to straighten the nasal septum, or a surgery to clear out the sinuses known as endoscopic sinus surgery.

Sources include:

MedicineNet.com

NHS.uk

HealthLine.com

EarthClinic.com

HomeNaturalCures.com



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