Acoustic Neuroma — causes, side effects and treatments at NaturalPedia.com

Wednesday, December 20, 2017 by

Acoustic neuroma is a noncancerous brain tumor that develops in the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. It grows gradually, and as it grows, it presses against the hearing and balance nerves, thus affecting the person’s ability to hear and balance.

There are two types of acoustic neuroma: unilateral acoustic neuromas and bilateral acoustic neuromas. Unilateral acoustic neuroma is the most common type and it only affects one ear. It may develop at any age, but it most often occurs between the ages of 30 and 60. On the other hand, bilateral acoustic neuroma affects both ears and is inherited. It is caused by a genetic problem known as neurofibromatosis-2 (NF2).

Acoustic neuroma can also be a result of constant or continuous exposure to loud noise, such as music- or work-related noise. In addition, it can be caused by neck or face radiation. Acoustic neuroma is also known as acoustic neurilemmoma, acoustic neurinoma, auditory tumor, or vestibular schwannoma.

Known side effects of acoustic neuroma

The side effects of acoustic neuroma include loss of hearing on one side, ringing in ears, and dizziness and balance problems. A large acoustic neuroma can also sometimes cause persistent headaches, temporary blurred or double vision, numbness, pain or weakness on one side of the face, problems with limb coordination on one side of the body,  a hoarse voice, and difficulty swallowing.

Body systems harmed by acoustic neuroma

The body systems that acoustic neuroma can harm include the auditory, nervous, ocular, immune, muscular, and digestive systems.

Food items or nutrients that may prevent acoustic neuroma

According to an article published on HomeNaturalCures.com, the food items or nutrients that may prevent acoustic neuroma include the following:

  • Barberine
  • Boswellia
  • Ginkgo biloba
  • Green tea
  • Macrobiotic diet
  • Selenium
  • Shark cartilage
  • Sulforaphane
  • Turmeric
  • Vitamin B
  • Vitamin E
  • Zinc

Treatments, management plans for acoustic neuroma

Acoustic neuromas can be managed in three ways: surgical removal of the tumor, arresting tumor growth with the of use stereotactic radiation therapy, or careful serial observation. Surgery done with specialized instruments under a microscope may be needed in some individuals with an acoustic neuroma.

Where to learn more

Summary

Acoustic neuroma is a noncancerous brain tumor that affects hearing and balance.

Acoustic neuroma can cause loss of hearing on one side, ringing in ears, and dizziness and balance problems.

Acoustic neuroma can also relentless headaches, temporary blurred or double vision, numbness, pain or weakness on one side of the face, problems with limb coordination on one side of the body, a hoarse voice, and difficulty swallowing.

Acoustic neuroma can be managed by surgical removal of tumor, stereotactic radiation therapy, or careful serial observation.

Sources include:

MedLinePlus.gov

HopkinsMedicine.org

NHS.uk

HomeNaturalCures.com

EMedicine.Medscape.com

RareDiseases.org



Comments

comments powered by Disqus