Mustard Seeds – sources, health benefits, nutrients, uses and constituents at NaturalPedia.com

Saturday, July 22, 2017 by

Mustards, which are also called sarsons, come in three varieties: the black mustards (Brassica nigra), which are cultivated in South Asia; the brown mustards (Brassica juncea), which originated from the sub-Himalayan plains of Northern India; and white mustards (Sinapis alba or Brassica alba), whose seeds are either white or light straw-yellow in color and are more abundant than the two mustard varieties mentioned earlier.

Mustards are oftentimes used to add flavor in meals that are featured in Indian cuisine, as mustards are very rich and tangy.

Around 700 pounds of mustard seeds are being consumed all over the world on a daily basis.

History books showed that early Romans were the first people who used mustard seed paste as a condiment in cooking.

List of known nutrients

  • Calcium
  • Carotene
  • Copper
  • Fatty acids
  • Folates
  • Iron
  • Lutein
  • Magnesium
  • Manganese
  • Niacin
  • Riboflavin
  • Selenium
  • Thiamine
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B3
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • Zeaxanthin
  • Zinc

Medicinal uses for mustard seeds

The selenium and magnesium content of mustard seeds lend it its anti-inflammatory and heat-producing properties that help alleviate arthritic, muscle, and rheumatoid pain. For best results, apply the paste of mustard seeds on the affected area of your body.

Filled with B-complex vitamins like folates, niacin, riboflavin, and thiamine, mustard seeds are good in boosting one’s metabolism and speeding up the weight loss process. Going the other direction, one can also use mustard seeds to increase one’s appetite by drinking a glass of milk with black mustard seeds in it.

Hair growth-promoting minerals such as fatty acids, calcium, magnesium, and iron are found in mustard seeds. For best results, apply oil extracts from mustard seeds to your hair, then wrap your hair in a thin plastic bag or a warm towel so your hair could better absorb the concoction. Massaging your hair once a week with mustard seed oil extracts can also treat dandruff and provide the hair with shine as well as bounce.

If you have asthma, bronchitis, or are experiencing chest congestions, you might want to take a gander at turning to mustard seeds for relief.

The presence of carotenes, lutein, zeaxanthin, and vitamins A, C, and K in mustard seeds helps slow down the process of aging. Use them as natural scrubs to lather your face and body with to get rid of unwanted dead skin.

Mustard seeds are good for your gastrointestinal health as they reduce instances of constipation and rectal bleeding and increase bile acid binding with the help of their mucilage content. For best results, ingest one to three teaspoons of mustard seed extracts to alleviate constipation. Mustard seeds are full of fiber and boost saliva generation for better digestion of food in the body. They also lower cholesterol levels with the help of their rich vitamin B3 content.

Mustard seeds inhibit the development of cancer cells with the help of isothiocyanates and myrosinase enzymes.

Migraines, aches and pains, and contact dermatitis, which is a type of skin irritation that results from being exposed to allergens, are addressed with the ingestion of mustard seeds.

A mustard seed concoction can work effectively as a poison-repulsion aid, especially when the poisoning is brought on by excessive narcotic or alcohol use.

Mustard seeds have anti-bacterial qualities, and are good for treating lesions and disorders caused by ringworms.

Body systems supported by mustard seeds

The immune system is protected with the regular ingestion of mustard seeds due to their high manganese and copper content.

Bone, heart, and teeth health are protected by the calcium in mustard seeds.

The nervous system is also positively impacted by mustard seed ingestion, as mustard can stimulate nerve impulses and awaken sleeping points within the nerves.

Ways to use mustard seeds

Use mustard seeds in salad dressings, meat and fish dishes, and as garnish.

Where to learn more

Summary

Mustard seeds inhibit the development of cancer cells with the help of isothiocyanates and myrosinase enzymes.

Mustard seeds have anti-bacterial qualities, and are good for treating lesions and disorders caused by ringworms.

Bone, heart, and teeth health are protected by the calcium in mustard seeds.

Sources include:

TheHealthSite.com

HealthBenefitsTimes.com

Nutrition-And-You.com

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